Compliant But Not Necessarily Secure? How HR Can Help..

As the recent Target breach has shown: being compliant alone does not necessarily mean inherently secure. As a recent analysis of the theft of personal and financial information of 110 million Target customers by the United States Senate illustrates, key warning signals that Target’s network was being infiltrated were missed in the organisation. Both anti-malware and SIEM identified suspicious behaviour on their network, yet two days later the attackers began exporting customer data from their network.

HR - business functions, business operations, business processes

© Rawpixel – Fotolia.com

The fact that Target was certified as being compliant with the PCI DSS standard just two months before the breach took place has certainly caused a lot of debate in the industry. I’ve always argued that simply persuing an annual ‘checkbox exercise’ is not enough: there must be a lasting and on-going cultural awareness with regards to data security.

I’ve also long argued that whilst responsibility and drive for data security lie at board level; the entire business needs to be both aware and on-board too. That’s why HR is vital to achieving the role. KPIs for data security, along with employee training programmes need to enhance the goals of the CISO. Data security KPIs should be SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-orientated. Across all business units there should be at least annual (and perhaps quarterly, depending upon the nature of the business) employee awareness training programmes.

The KPIs should be pertinent to the area of the business unit they operate in and relevant to the data security standard your organisation is working towards gaining (or maintaining) being compliant with. For PCI DSS, for example, the requirement to ‘Protect Cardholder Data’ clearly has different implications for different business units. For a call centre, for example the requirement should be around not storing PANS in a readable format; not recording CV2 numbers when taken over the phone; not writing cardholder details down on bits of paper for subsequent entry; and the secure physical storage of paper records. For development, this would pertain to: encryption methods used and key storage and protection; how PANs are rendered unreadable electronically and adherence to the standard; how cardholder data is transmitted across networks. For IT support, these could relate to maintaining up to date anti-malware and intrusion prevention systems; hourly monitoring of SIEM information; weekly reports to senior management concerning monitoring status and patch levels.

Whilst line managers are usually responsible for setting KPIs in a business, I strongly believe HR can make a valuable contribution: by enforcing company policy in ensuring all line managers include data security quarterly KPIs in their target setting. A function of HR in a business is to safeguard the reputation of a business, something which is also the function of an information security professional.

A recent study by insurance firm Beazley analysed more than 1,500 data breaches it services between 2013 and 2014, and discovered that employee errors accounted for 55% of them. HR is also about people management and defining the culture of an organisation. Whilst I’m not suggesting that HR take on responsibility for information security, they certainly have a part to play in ensuring that the correct mindset operates across all parts of the business. Changing an organisation’s culture requires a sustained effort from numerous players across the business: and HR is one of the key ones.

Phil Stewart is director of Excelgate Consulting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: